Essay On Learning Service

Service Learning:
Connect Classroom Learning with Societal Issues

Hide Caption
James Madison University students installing a meteorological tower in Quinby, VA. Photo courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Provenance: Photo courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

This page builds on ideas and outcomes from faculty discussions at the workshop, Systems, Society, Sustainability and the Geosciences, held in July 2012.

Service learning engages students in genuine problem-solving and brings their learning directly into their community. When emphasizing connections with societal challenges, service learning is a natural fit for students to forge working relationships with community partners and to embark on the complex, yet enriching, process of tackling real-world problems.


Jump down to: Concepts Taught via Service Learning | Effective Teaching Strategies | Opportunities for Strengthening Teaching | Teaching Materials

Pedagogic guidance for bringing service learning into your classroom

There are many benefits of service learning, including enhancing student learning and personal development while also providing benefits to other constituents. These advantages, among others, are discussed in the Service Learning module from Pedagogy in Action. This module contains pedagogic grounding in using the service learning method, ideas for classroom implementation, and examples of over 30 service learning projects from a variety of disciplines.

The On the Cutting Edge project explored the use of service learning in a geoscience context. As a result of a 2010 workshop, the module Service Learning in the Geosciences was produced. This module contains resources about project design, student motivation, assessment, and more than 35 geoscience examples of service learning projects.

What concepts or outcomes can be addressed using service learning?

Service learning is an effective means to teach about sustainability and to link classroom learning to community challenges.

Using service learning, students can:

  • see the relevance and tangible application of how concepts learned in class relate to society
  • develop an understanding of the research process from "big ideas" to experimental design to analysis
  • experience the complexity and unpredictability of engaging with real world problems
  • learn to synthesize, integrate, and infer relationships
  • develop independence and learn professionalism
  • understand the nature of non-unique solutions
  • be resourceful to solve challenges independently and creatively
  • develop "soft skills" in working with community partners
  • see themselves as relevant and empowered
  • strengthen civic agency
  • improve motivation and take their work more seriously when they have a real client.
Read more about the benefits of service learning from Pedagogy in Action.

Hide Caption
Students work in community gardens that provide hands-on learning for University of Georgia students interested in Urban and Sustainable Agriculture. Photo by Stephanie Schupska, UGA CAES.

Provenance: Photo by Stephanie Schupska, UGA CAES.
Reuse: If you wish to use this item outside this site in ways that exceed fair use (see http://fairuse.stanford.edu/) you must seek permission from its creator.

Effective strategies for teaching with service learning

Designing, executing and assessing a service learning project can be a complex process that is not without risks. However, you can take advantage of the wealth of experience, resources, and materials developed by other faculty.

  • Scale the project so that it is appropriate for the skill level of the students and the time frame allotted.
  • Have classroom content that dovetails with service learning activities.
  • Have students write about their activities in a journal, blog or web page as one mechanism for assessment.
  • Make use of expertise and resources from the community/stakeholders.
  • Have the class collectively participate in a research project from conception to completion.
  • Use scaled activities. These can be effective and increase student motivation. For example, there might be an expected level of effort for a course, but additional effort may lead to co-authorship of a paper.
  • Outsource research experiences in order to help manage faculty loads and broaden student experiences.
  • Use service learning successes to improve town-gown relations.

Learn more about How to Use Service Learning and The 8 Block Model for Project Design, and Assessing Service Learning Projects.

Hide Caption
Students from the University of Colorado add photovoltaic panels to their 2005 Solar Decathlon house. The team carefully selected the home's rooftop PV system and building-integrated PV awnings, which provide shade as well as electricity. Photo courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Provenance: Photo courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Opportunities to strengthen the use of service learning

A successful service learning project requires cooperation at many levels: from students, community partners, institutional administration, and departments. Thus, there are many pathways to creating a robust environment for service learning.

  • Develop partnerships with research institutions who have capacity to take on small student projects.
  • Seek out opportunities to integrate disciplines or create partnerships around a central theme (a water cycle mural project combining art and science, for example).
  • Convey to students why a research experience is important for them (e.g. a product to share with potential employers or graduate advisors).
  • Strengthen or create new outlets for presentation, sharing and publication of student research or products of service learning.
  • Make use of online services such as the National Service Learning Clearinghouse, which offers a search platform leading to thousands of service learning resources for all educational levels, including curricula, publications, assessment resources, and funding ideas.
  • Explore resources offered by Campus Compact, a national coalition that promotes public and community service and includes partnerships among more than 1,100 college and universities. The Campus Compact aims to help campuses forge effective community partnerships, and provides resources and training for faculty seeking to integrate civic and community-based learning into the curriculum.
  • Develop strategies and resources for teaching research skills.
  • Have students do the leg work to develop their own projects.
  • Develop mechanisms for connecting the faculty/class resources with community needs (matchmaking).
  • Pursue support from administration to address challenges and limited resources available to support student research.
  • Have coursework support research and work towards an integrated curriculum.
  • Communicate the value of student research projects to administration and peer colleagues (e.g. for promotion/tenure).
  • Develop a white paper on the importance of research and service learning in undergraduate education.
  • Create a virtual faculty mentoring program through an online forum or email list to share the experience.
  • Support civic agency - get ideas for course design and activities.

Materials and Resources for Service Learning

See how other faculty are using service learning projects with these examples from a range of disciplines and learning environments.

Collections of service learning projects

Service learning example projects, from Pedagogy in Action, contains projects from the sciences, economics and education.
Service learning projects, from On the Cutting Edge, has examples from the geosciences.

Relevant materials from InTeGrate workshop participants

Essay: Service Learning in Interdisciplinary Courses - Maureen Padden, McMaster University
Activity: Service-Learning to Explore Sustainability - Tracy Lai, Seattle Central Community College

Courses that use service learning:

Other Service Learning Resources

How we help with essays

We are always ready to help you with your essays. Our role here is to give advice and guidance so that you can develop successful essay writing skills and practices.  We hope these will sustain you over a range of modules, and across the years you spend at Kent. Essay writing is a very popular area for academic advice and guidance. Many of our students comment on the way their grades improve once they seek advice; but this improvement takes place over time, and through your efforts. There are no instant solutions, but much we can say about good essay writing techniques. In general, we feel our guidance rests upon sensible recognition of clear boundaries between ourselves, students and departments.

What we can do

What we cannot do

Preparing/planning essays

  • Help you understand the essay title
  • Help you plan your essay
  • Provide guidance on successful reading/note-taking techniques
  • Help you manage the reading load
  • Guide you in writing your literature review
  • Help you with time-management
  • Discuss the academic content of your essay
  • Make judgements about your ideas and sources
  • Evaluate your reading material, or suggest further reading

Drafts

  • Help you organise/structure your essay by discussing-
    • Overall structure
    • Paragraph and sentence structure
  • Give you an opportunity to clarify your ideas
  • Help you write in an academic style
  • Help you reference effectively to avoid plagiarism

Help you with grammar, spelling and punctuation by examining a section of your writing

  • Re-write any of your essay
  • Select evidence for you
  • Correct citations and references across the whole of a document
  • Proof-read your document

Post - submission

  • Help you to learn from feed-back 
  • Re-mark your essay
  • Challenge your final grade
  • Enter into any kind of dispute between you and your department

 

If you have any questions about confidentiality, or any other aspect of the Student Learning Advisory Service work, please contact us. We will be happy to discuss this with you.

0 Thoughts to “Essay On Learning Service

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrĂ  pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *