Personal Statement Biomedical Science Examples Of Gases

Biomedical sciences relate to medicine and the human condition. New developments in this area can have an immediate impact on our lives.

Biomedical Sciences encompasses a broad range of inter-related life sciences disciplines. These concern the structure and function of the human body in health and disease.

Biomedical scientists research new and improved ways to diagnose and treat human diseases. These contribute to improvements in human health and wellbeing in general.

At Dundee the biomedical sciences focus on:

  • the structure and normal function of the human body
  • the effects of disease and ways to prevent and treat disease
  • the study of anatomy in relation to health, disease and human identification
  • the study of physiology from the molecular level to that of the whole organism
  • understanding how the brain and nervous system function in health and disease
  • understanding how drugs work.

Undergraduate student Rachel from Malaysia talks about the Biomedical Sciences BSc at the University of Dundee

Degree flexibility

Our flexible choice of modules means you'll get to study a wide variety of topics. This broad exposure gives you the time to develop your understanding of biomedical science. You can then choose to specialise or graduate with a broad biomedical sciences degree.

The following are the minimum, up-to-date entry requirements.

Courses starting 2018
QualificationLevel 1 EntryAdvanced Entry to Level 2
SQA Higher/Advanced HigherAABB at Higher including biology and chemistry, plus mathematics (Standard Grade at 3 or National 5/Intermediate2 at C)AB at Advanced Higher including biology and chemistry, plus BB at Higher in different subjects, plus mathematics (Standard Grade at 3 or National 5/Intermediate2 at C)
GCE A-LevelABB (minimum) - AAB (typical) including A-Level biology and chemistry, plus GCSE mathematics at C / 4ABB (minimum) - AAB (typical) including A-Level biology and chemistry, plus GCSE mathematics at C / 4
Irish Leaving Certificate (ILC)H2H2H3H3 at Higher Level including biology and chemistry, plus Ordinary Level mathematics at O2Level 2 entry is not possible with this qualification
International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma30 points at Higher Level grades 5, 5, 5 to include biology and chemistry, plus Standard Level mathematics at grade 4.
A combination of IB Certificate plus other qualifications, such as A-Levels, Advanced Placement Tests or the International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme (IBCP), will also be considered.
34 points at Higher Level grades 6, 6, 5 to include biology and chemistry, plus Standard Level mathematics at grade 4
Graduate Entry
BTECBTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma can be considered for the Foundation Year in Life Sciences.Level 2 Entry is not possible with this qualification
SQA Higher National (HNC/HND)A relevant HNC with grade A in the graded unit with appropriate Science unitsA relevant HNC with grade A in the graded unit and 120 SCQF Credits or A relevant HND with grade AA in the graded units with appropriate Science units
Scottish BaccalaureateDistinction with AB at AH Biology and Chemistry. Mathematics at SG (grade 3) or Intermediate 2 / National 5 (grade C)Distinction with AB at AH Biology and Chemistry. Mathematics at SG (grade 3) or Intermediate 2 / National 5 (grade C)
SWAP AccessRelevant science subjects with AAA grades to include Chemistry and Biology/Human Biology at SCQF Level 6Level 2 entry is not possible with this qualification
Advanced DiplomaApplicants with this qualification would be considered for Level 2 entryGrade A with ASL-A Level Biology and Chemistry at AB. Mathematics at GCSE C
Welsh BaccalaureatePass with A-Levels in Biology and Chemistry at AB. Mathematics at GCSE grade C / 4Pass with A-Levels in Biology and Chemistry at AB. Mathematics at GCSE grade C / 4
European Baccalaureate70% overall with 7 in Biology and Chemistry75% overall with 7.5 in Biology and Chemistry
Other Qualifications
Notes

 EU and International qualifications



If you choose to leave at the end of Level 3, you will graduate with a BSc Ordinary degree in Biomedical Sciences that reflects the breadth of subjects you studied at Level 3, as well as the core knowledge and skills gained throughout your degree programme.

If you are aiming for an Honours degree you will graduate with one of

  • Biomedical Sciences BSc (Hons)
  • Neuroscience BSc (Hons)
  • Pharmacology BSc (Hons)
  • Physiological Sciences BSc (Hons)

How you will be taught

We use a variety of teaching methods, with lectures and practicals forming the core. In addition, we use

  • workshops
  • tutorials
  • computer-based learning
  • media / video exercises

as appropriate to each module.

How you will be assessed

All modules are assessed by a combination of in-course and end-of-course assignments. Regular in-course assessments (e.g. practical reports, computer-based exercises, essays and data processing exercises) provide feedback on your progress and help you prepare for end-of-module examinations.

Online assignments are used extensively at Levels 1 and 2, with access on or off campus. Peer assessment is used to promote teamwork and group learning.

What you will study

Typical course structure

The modules are running during the 2016-2017 academic year. We refresh our modules every year to keep our courses up to date, so your modules may be different.

Levels 1 and 2

All Life Sciences degree programmes share common core modules at Level 1 that provide a general introduction to the life sciences through an integrated programme of lectures, tutorials, practical work and field excursions.

Level 1 - core modules

BS11001 - Introduction to the Life Sciences: the early years

Semester 1

Number of credits: 10

This is a module that introduces aspects of two major concepts: the basics of heredity and evolution. For basics of heredity, an introduction to genetics, inheritance of traits, and the fidelity of genetic information over generations will be given. The concept of evolution will consider Darwin's theory of evolution through natural selection, the nature of variation, the ways in which selection acts upon variation and descent from a single common ancestor. Finally the concept of molecular evolution explores how genes and genomes evolve to produce the diversity of life systems observed today.

BS11002 - Introduction to the Life Sciences: why go multicellular?

Credits: 10

Semester: 1

This is a module that introduces aspects of major concepts: The Gene, Evolution and Biological Organisation. The concept of the Gene covers major topics such as DNA, genes, genomes, reproduction and heredity. The concept of Evolution introduces the topics of multicellularity and the benefits of being multicellular. The concept of Biological Organisation introduces the topic of chemical transmission and how characteristics are retained from simple animals such as the coelenterates to more complex animals such as the chordates. The need for a nervous system and the early development of nervous systems including simple nerve nets are explored from an evolutionary perspective.

BS11003 - Laboratory and Research Skills 1A

Semester: 1

Number of credits: 10

This module will start with a mandatory introduction to health and safety and basic lab skills. There will be one field excursion and a series of practical classes that will cover techniques of isolation and culture of microorganisms and gram staining. Other set practical classes include: arthropod diversity and insect dissection, forensic entomology and the analysis of DNA.

BS11004 - Laboratory and Research Skills 1B

Semester: 1

Number of credits: 10

This module will extend and develop the generic skills introduced in BS11003 with specific emphasis on health and safety and basic laboratory practice. The ability to work effec tively as part of a group will form a significant part of this module. Students will extend their information literacy skills by locating and accessing scientific resources to support their learning.

To support the group lab project, students will receive guidance on lab- book/record keeping, experimental design and project planning, in addition to interpretation of data and presentation of project results. Students will also be encouraged to reflect on and evaluate their own learning throughout the semester, identifying areas for development and consolidation.

BS11005 - Introduction to Maths, Physics & Chemistry

Semester 1:

Number of credits: 20

This module introduces the application of the physical  sciences and mathematics to the Life Sciences. T he module covers aspects of basic  physics, chemistry and mathematics including numeracy and mathematical application; biophysics; organic; and physical chemistry and the introduction to and  use of numeric and scientific literacy. The use of technology to support and enhance application within the Life Sciences will form a significant part of this module, which  will be both theoretical and practical in delivery.

BS12001 - Life: building the organism

Semester: 2

Number of credits: 10

This module develops aspects of four major concepts:  The Cell, the Gene, Evolution and Biological Organisation. The concept of the Cell  covers major topics such as cell division, chromosome structure, sexual  reproduction, germ cells, meiosis and fertilisation. The concept of the Gene covers  the major topic of genetics, introducing genes and alleles and gives a functional  explanation of Mendel’s Laws. The concept of Evolution introduces topics such as  the Mesozoic ecosystem structure and the transition of life to land, including the  dominance of insects, amphibians and reptiles. Consideration will be given to the  physiological problems of life on land (reproductive freedom from water, breathing air  [especially during the mid- Devonian drop in global oxygen levels], water conservation  and the emergence of the mammal -like reptiles). The concept of Biological  Organisation covers topics such as changes in posture, heart anatomy, respiratory  capacity, temperature regulation and endothermy in terrestrial vertebrates. Fluid  balance, homeostasis and the basic principles of endocrinology are introduced,  together with the basic concepts of neurophysiology, muscles and  movement.

BS12002 - Life: the underlying structures

Semester: 2

Number of credits: 10

This module develops aspects of three topics: i)  Energy and Metabolism, ii) The Cell and its Environment, and iii) Animals: Form and  Function.

Energy and metabolism introduces the major topics of chemical and biological  thermodynamics covering enzymes (as biological catalysts, their structure and basic  mechanisms), enzyme kinetics, energy  flow and transfer and the basic principles of  metabolism in autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms.

The Cell and its Environment develops the topic of cell structure, covering  intracellular compartmentalisation and trafficking; lipids and membranes, with specific  emphasis on the biochemical and biophysical properties of membranes.

The Animals: Form and Function topic starts with the basic concept that specialised  cells form tissues and organs which in turn interact at the level of the whole- organism. Phys iological systems (endocrine, nervous, circulatory, gas exchange and  excretory) in animals of increasing complexity are used as examples, highlighting  links between form and function and to illustrate the importance of homeostasis.

BS12003 - Laboratory and Research Skills 1C

Semester: 2

Number of credits: 10

This module will extend and develop laboratory and research skills introduced in semester 1 of Level 1

  • Optical techniques – Students will use a spectrophotometer to produce a standard absorbance spectrum, apply the Beer -Lambert Law to derive unknown concentrations from known values of absorbance and perform a Bradford Assay
  • Protein purification – Students will experience two techniques that are commonly used to separate mixtures of proteins: size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) 
  • PCR - In conjunction with its associated workshop, this laboratory exercise aims to give students a basic understanding of the practical application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the use of agarose gel electrophoresis for the analysis of DNA samples.
  • Enzyme kinetics – Students will gain practical experience of a typical enzyme assay procedure.
  • Digital skills – online scientific literature searches
  • Protein expression – Students will learn how to purify and analyse a recombinant protein.

BS12004 - Laboratory and Research Skills 1D

Semester: 2

Number of credits: 10

This module will extend and develop the generic  skills introduced in BS12003 with specific emphasis on data presentation,  interpretation and analysis. The ability to work effectively as part of a group and the  application of peer support and peer-assessment will form a significant part of this  module. Students will extend their information literacy and scientific writing skills by  researching and presenting an area of current research in poster format, giving due  attention to scientific writing protocols. Students will be encouraged to reflect on  and evaluate their own learning throughout the semester, identifying areas for  development and consolidation and setting appropriate targets.

BS12005 - Science in Society (optional)

Semester: 2

Number of credits: 20

This module outlines the historic development of  the Life Sciences from alchemy with its origins in ancient Egypt to the present day. It  covers key milestone events such as identifying the structure of DNA and cloning of  Dolly the sheep and includes pivotal figures such as da Vinci, Darwin and Watson and Crick. The module explores the relationship between art and science through  botany, anatomy and forensic art and reviews modern popular science writers such  as Stephen Jay Gould, Richard Dawkins and Nick Lane. The module goes on to  examine the significance of the philosophical framework within which science is  developed and how this has impacted upon the direction of scientific thought. The  moral and ethical implications of scientific research and devel opment are analysed  within traditional and contemporary contexts such as bodysnatchers, stem cell  research, use of animals and humans in research and the nature/nurture debate.  The role of the media in shaping society’s opinion and interpretation of science is  discussed in relation to the  public understanding of science .

BS12008 - Introduction to Scientific Enterprise (optional)

Semester: 2

Number of credits: 20

The purpose  of this module  is to inspire students to  think beyond  their programme of studies and plan their own business/research idea.  This module  will consist  of:

  • Inspire  Dundee - Lectures  from inspirational members of staff who run their  own companies.
  • Intellectual Property -  discovering  what people want to think about when  protecting their  own ideas, an overview of patent law.
  • CV Writing skills
  • The Money Pot - where  to obtain funding and how to  write a successful proposal.  
  • The Plan - writing business plans and discovering how much money is needed  to set up  a business/run a lab.

Level 1 - optional modules

BS11006 - The Poison Pen (optional)

Semester: 1

Number of credits: 20

This module  offers a science based optional module  which may be of particular interest to those students who intend to specialise in  later years in either pharmacology or drug discovery. The module will look at  several classical English texts in which poisonings play a pivotal role in the plot. After examination of the text, the symptoms will then be  unpicked and possible poison molecules identified along with their source. Students  will be able to explore the darker side of pharmacology and look at the importance  of  dosage and how molecules used to cure can also kill.

Level 2 - core modules

BS21001 - The Evolution of Modern Life

Semester 1

Number of credits: 10

The module will be covering the evolution of life in the Cenozoic era. The first half of which will be a general to specific introduction to statistics for the biosciences, bringing students up to speed on the structure of datasets and how one infers differences. This will also include an introduction to the design of experiments, concepts of randomisation and blocking; regression, anova and principle tests of signal versus noise. The second half of the module will address the geological, climatic and biological changes that have led to the modern disposition of the continents. This will cover major climatic themes that have shaped modern life including sea level change and glaciation; evolutionary development of birds and mammals; the evolution of endothermy; the biogeographic distributions of biota; and the adaptive radiation/evolution of the mammals. This will also include a comprehensive introduction to human origins and the impact this species has on nature. Topics including the evolution of the hominid lineage; predation/parasitism, and disease/population dynamics. Students will be expected to complete a substantial piece of coursework related to a component of the indicative content.

BS21002 - The Gene and the Cell

Semester 1

Number of credits: 10

This module builds the foundations for our understanding of genetics and molecular biology. DNA is at the core of explaining who we are and how we are different and this module explores the role of DNA in transmitting information from generation to generation, how that information is copied and used, and how that use is regulated. With that foundation the module explores how we can manipulate the genetic code of an organism to take on new functions and respond to stimuli, and what happens when the regulation of the cell goes wrong.

BS21003 - Laboratory and Research Skills 2A

Semester 1

Number of credits: 10

This module will extend and develop laboratory and research skills introduced in Level 1 (direct Level 2 entrant students will have an opportunity to learn skills and techniques at the start of semester 1).  There is specific emphasis on the following subject areas: comparison of kinetic and thermodynamic control in protein folding, use of aseptic techniques through the use of bacteria, the broad use and application of antibodies in Life Sciences, introduction of the concepts of osmolarity and tonicity and retrieval and analysis of sequence information (genetic, cDNA and amino acid) from online databases.  A significant component of the taught element of this module is devoted to the study and application of statistics, data analysis and representation, using the R-Studio software tool.  A summatively assessed lab skills test is set at the end of the module.

BS21004 - Laboratory and Research Skills 2B

Semester 1

Number of credits: 10

Students will carry out two laboratory projects which will allow them to gain experience in the use of laboratory equipment and techniques.  The projects will cover basic organic synthesis of biological molecules and also a forensic chemistry investigation.  These projects will allow them to improve their experimental planning, risk assessment, report writing and data analysis skills.  Group work will involve oral and written presentation skills and provide team building experience.

Module not available to non-Life Science students except forensic anthropology and anatomical science students

BS22001 – Biomedical Sciences (20 credits)

Semester 2

Number of credits: 20

The aim of this module is to introduce students to specific topics within the Biomedical Sciences.  Topics will include: Nerve and muscle: the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), muscle contraction and body movements; Cardiovascular system: heart function and integrated control of blood pressure; Pharmacology of NMJ and heart muscle; Effects of exercise on cardiovascular systemSkills - Students will develop and apply skills in problem solving, teamwork and IT and be encouraged to develop self-reliance and independent study skills.

BS22002 – Biological Sciences

Number of credits: 20

The aim of this module is to give students a sound foundation in biomolecular mechanisms and processes.
This module will study the main mammalian metabolic pathways and their control including the molecular processes involved.  The module will also look at current topics in microbiology including disease and resistance and introduce immunology and virology.

BS22003 – Laboratory and Research Skills 2C

Semester 2

Number of credits: 20

The aim of this module is to broaden and strengthen both the practical and generic skills of students by building on experience gained at level 1 and semester 1 of level 2.

The module will expand on techniques and skills introduced in earlier practical modules.  Practicals will be accompanied by data handling and manipulation workshops.  Basic concepts in ethics in the Biosciences will be introduced in a workshop.  Careers and employability exercises will help students to decide on their future career paths.  Generic skills will be reinforced by updating students’ PDP.

Module not available to non-Life Science students except forensic anthropology and anatomical science students

Level 2 - optional modules

BS21008 - Bioinorganic, Biophysical and Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences Workshops

Semester: 1

Number of credits: 10

This module will consist of one tutorial session every  week covering: 

  • A recap on the fundamentals of molecular orbital theory, acids and bases and  physical chemistry as applied to Biology
  • Inorganic chemistry with particular reference to metals in biology such as iron,  copper and zinc and chelation therapy.
  • Trends in the periodic table will be looked at in-depth.
  • Organic chemistry content will focus on fundamental mechanisms, molecular struc ture, stereochemistry, and functional groups with a focus in  carboxylic acids.

BS21009 - Data analysis for the Life Sciences

Semester: 1

Number of credits: 10

This  module  will  provide  a general introduction to  statistics with specific examples for the biosciences, bringing students up to speed  on the structure of datasets and how one infers differences.  This will include an  introduction to the design of experiments, concept s of randomisation and blocking; Regression and Multiple regression; ANOVA (including posthoc testing); principle  tests of signal versus noise. Students will also be introduced to appropriate graphing  and representation of data. Students will be expected to complete a substantial  piece of coursework related to a component of the indicative content.

BS21010 - Introductory Programming for Life Sciences

Semester: 1

Number of credits: 10

This module focuses on the development of basic  programming skills using Python 3 for use in Life Sciences applications. The intention  is to provide a basic understanding of programming. This will be achieved by a  comprehensive hands-on experience of the use of these languages. The course is intended to provide a hands -on introduction to programming in Python  3. The expectation is that the skills acquired will provide a basic competency that will  enable the development of Python scripts that may be embraced in problem solving  and data analysis beyond this module.

BS21011 - Developing Scientific Enterprise

Semester: 1

Number of credits: 10

This module will consist  of:  

  • Theoretical concept of an entrepreneur – introduction to the current theory of what  makes an entrepreneur.
  • Research techniques – how to complete market research in order to evaluate the  feasibility of a business proposal and market the b usiness proposal once developed,  and how to conduct interviews in order to evaluate the entrepreneurial characteristics  of an individual.
  • Developing the business idea – Taking a basic business idea and adding flesh in the  form of determining the market, refining the processes, and understanding the key  components of the business model.
  • Numbers count – an introduction to key accounting models such as costing and  break -even analysis to allow students to financially evaluate their proposals.
  • Business Risk – how to evaluate and mitigate the business risks relating to individual  business proposals.  

At Levels 3 and 4 you will study a combination of modules appropriate to your chosen degree subject within the biomedical sciences theme.

If you are reading for a single Honours degree in one of these subjects you will take modules in your main subject combined with modules in other subjects in this group, or combined with Level 3 modules in an appropriate biological sciences subject.

Biomedical Sciences BSc

Level 3 - core modules

BS31013 - Biomembranes

Semester 1

Number of credits: 15

This module will provide the student with an understanding of the regulation of normal membrane function and the physiological principles underlying this, show how our current understanding of membrane function has been arrived at using examples from current literature, provide an understanding of some basic cellular and molecular physiological and pharmacological techniques and their application to investigate membrane function and enable the acquisition of skills, attitudes and techniques useful in the pursuit of modern biology.

BS31016 - Practical Techniques in Biomedical Sciences

Semester 1

Number of credits: 15

This module will broaden and strengthen the practical, laboratory research and generic skills of students by building on their level 1 and 2 or other previous experience and preparing them for more advanced study at level 4.

After successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of changes in biological membranes, pre-clinical methods used in drug screening and development, techniques available for evaluating human psychological and/or physiological responses and different types of study design in clinical trials.

BS31019 - Regulatory Physiology & Pharmacology

Semester 1

Number of credits: 15

This module will provide a good understanding of the physiological and pharmacological regulation of body systems for maintaining homeostasis.  After successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how key body systems are regulated by physiological and pharmacological agents in the maintenance of processes such as blood sugar, calcium balance, obesity/appetite/satiety and reproduction.

Level 3 - optional modules

BS31004 - Biochemistry & Cell Biology

Semester 1

Number of credits: 15

The aim of this Module is to introduce specific topics within the area of Biochemistry and Cell Biology that will underpin the more specialised areas that students will encounter in Semester 2 of Level 3 and in Level 4. The Module also aims to strengthen students’ skills in scientific writing, critical analysis of scientific literature and in self-directed learning.

Topics covered in the module are how proteins function at the molecular level, protein folding, targeting, posttranslational modification and turnover, the cytoskeleton, molecular motors, cell division and how cells form tissues, cell signalling and regulation of metabolism, bioenergy and photosynthesis, systems biology approaches.

BS31006 - Gene Regulation & Expression

Semester 1

Number of credits: 15

The aim of this module is to introduce specific topics within the area of Gene Regulation and Expression including examples of how defects at the molecular level result in disease. Topics will include transcription, translation, mRNA processing, RNAi and miRNA function and utilisation, DNA recombination and Epigenetics and genetic disease.

Students will understand the fundamental processes in molecular biology that are critical for gene expression in relation to cellular function. To be able to apply this knowledge and other information to explain the mechanism by which at least one disease state is manifest by perturbation and mutation of the apparatus to allow normal function.

BS31020 - Experimental Cell Culture

Semester 1

Number of credits: 15

To introduce practical tissue culture laboratory skills, and strengthen research and generic skills of students by building on their level 1 and 2 or other previous experience and preparing them for more advanced study at level 4.

After successful completion of this module students should be able to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the effects of signalling mechanisms on cells and molecules; of the techniques available for evaluating physiological responses in tissue culture cells; and of the principles underlying advanced instrumentation commonly used to assess experiments involving cultured cells e.g. fluorescent microscopes, luminometers.

BS32005 - Cell & Developmental Biology

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module is to introduce students to the specialist area of study of developmental biology building on their core curriculum in levels 1&2 and Semester 1 of Level 3.  To give the student an understanding of the stages and processes involved in the development of organisms. Topics include: Morphogenesis, patterning embryos, patterning tissues, morphogenetic movements, development and diseases stem cells.

Students will be able to explain broad aspects of the development of vertebrates and invertebrates and what happens when these processes go wrong and will develop their literature review skills, and group working and ways of presenting information in an informative manner.

BS32006 - Cell Signalling

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module will cover methods of cell-to-cell communication, signal transduction pathways, key proteins in signal transduction and downstream effects.

BS32009 - Immunology

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module will provide students with a broad understanding of key topics in immunology. This module will underpin more specialised areas of  immunology that the students will encounter in their Level 4 laboratory projects and in Semester 2 of Level 4. The module aims to strengthen students’ skills in problem solving, critical analysis of scientific literature and will be able to explain central concepts in the field of immunology and relate this to protection against infectious disease.

Students will be able to explain central concepts in the field of immunology and relate this to protection against infectious disease, innate immune mechanisms that sense and eliminate pathogens, processing and presentation of antigenic material to drive immune responses, antibody-mediated protection, development and activation of B and T lymphocytes, lymphocyte function, mucosal immune defences, immunological memory and vaccination, immunity to viruses, immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmune diseases and immune hyper reactivity.

BS32020 - Human Epithelial Biology

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module will provide a good understanding of the physiology and pharmacology of the human respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal systems.

After successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the functions and related pharmacology of respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal systems in human physiology.

BS32021 - Quantitative Pharmacology

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module will provide students with a good understanding of the quantitative aspects of pharmacology including mathematical descriptions of drug/receptor interactions and the handling of drugs by the body (pharmacokinetics).

After successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate receptor theory, including basic mathematical descriptions of receptor occupancy and the nature and diversity of allosteric interactions within receptor complexes, the area of pharmacokinetics and drug disposition within the body and the drug development process.

BS32022 - Human Morphogenesis and embryonic development

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module will provide the anatomical background to the human systems studied in the Biomedical Stream at level 3.

After study of this module, students will be able to; recognise the gross anatomy and histology of the systems covered, describe the pathology of these systems and explain the development of systems during the first trimester

BS32024 - Neuropsychopharmacology

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module will provide students with a good knowledge and understanding of chemical transmission within the central nervous system and how this may be modulated to achieve therapeutic benefit in several disorders of nervous system function.

After successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate chemical transmission within the central nervous system, pathological mechanisms involved in disorders of the central nervous system and the modulation of chemical transmission to achieve therapeutic benefit.

BS32026 - Sensory & Motorneuroscience

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module will provide an opportunity to acquire a good understanding of the physiology and anatomy of systems that govern the sensory perception and motor function.

After successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how nervous systems, in particular the motor and sensory systems, are built and function, using examples from all stages of neural organization (at the molecular, cellular, circuits and systems levels).

BS32028 - Molecular Pharmacology

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module will provide an understanding of the fundamental principles of molecular pharmacology, from drug receptor interactions to activation of intracellular signalling cascades.

After successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate and explain the basic principles of receptor pharmacology, with a focus on G protein coupled receptor structure, signalling and function.

BS32029 - Cell Proliferation and Survival Mechanisms Underlying Disease

Semester: 2

Credits: 15

This module will provide a firm grounding in key molecular mechanisms and pathways  underpinning proliferation and survival relevant to the development of cancer and other  disease-related themes at levels 3 and 4. Additionally, it will  provide  an insight into the  experimental appr oaches that have advanced the field of cancer biology . Topics  covered will include  reversible post-translational modification of proteins and the  nature/function of the enzymes that mediate these processes, with emphasis on their  dysregulation in cancer; major pathways controlling proliferation and survival including  cell cycle regulation and programmed cell death; key principles by which transcriptional  regulation underpinning the control of gene expression is perturbed during cancer   development;  pathological mechanisms (with emphasis on post-translational  modification) by which stimulatory and inhibitory signals regulate cell cycle control  through selective gene expression in cancer ; and general therapeutic strategies in  cancer based on the understanding of these pathways.

BS32030 - Data and Statistical Analysis

Semester: 2

Number of credits: 15

This module  will  provide  a broad  knowledge  base  in data analysis for students of life sciences.  Aspects of generalized linear modelling using datasets will be revisited and  extended . Topics explored will include generalised linear modelling using error  structures that aren’t normally distributed; analysis of data with  fixed, random and mixed  effects; principal component analysis  and other clustering techniques; and analysis of  experimental designs that involve nested, split plot or non-orthogonal data.

Level 4 - core modules

BS41004/07 - Research Project

Semester 1

Number of credits: 40

Building on their prior knowledge and skills, students will expand their research experience by participating in a semester long research project based around one chosen area of Life Sciences. Depending on the type of project chosen, students will learn advanced practical techniques and/or enhance their data interpretation skills, analysis of current literature, scientific writing and communication skills. All students will enhance their skills in planning and time management. Four main types of projects are available to students:

A) Individual lab based research - students will carry out research into a current topic allied to and within a research group in the Schools of Life Sciences or Medicine

B) Group lab based research - students will plan and carry out investigations into a current area of research. They will work cooperatively to carry out investigations and produce data but write individual reports.

C) Science communication and/or education - students will prepare materials to communicate current research topics and techniques to a public audience. The project must include a data analysis component.

D) Data analysis project which must include analysis of published and/or unpublished scientific data and will contribute towards the body of knowledge in a specific field.

BS41005/06 - Research Skills

Semester 1

Number of credits: 20

The aim of this module is to use the vibrant research environment of the School of Life Sciences, James Hutton Institute, and the School of Medicine, to expand student experience of current research and provide an opportunity to be part of the wider research culture. After instruction in proposal writing, students will prepare a grant or outreach proposal based on their research project. Students will attend seminars given by internal and external researchers on a wide range of bioscience topics. A summarized account of one selected seminar will be submitted for assessment. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of current research by applying this to current "big questions" in Life and Biomedical Sciences in a general examination paper held during semester 1. A final synopsis of their Honours year project will be displayed as a poster during the Honours Year Symposium at the end of the project research period.

Level 4 - optional modules

BS32005 - Cell & Developmental Biology

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module is to introduce students to the specialist area of study of developmental biology building on their core curriculum in levels 1&2 and Semester 1 of Level 3.  To give the student an understanding of the stages and processes involved in the development of organisms. Topics include: Morphogenesis, patterning embryos, patterning tissues, morphogenetic movements, development and diseases stem cells.

Students will be able to explain broad aspects of the development of vertebrates and invertebrates and what happens when these processes go wrong and will develop their literature review skills, and group working and ways of presenting information in an informative manner.

BS32006 - Cell Signalling

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module will cover methods of cell-to-cell communication, signal transduction pathways, key proteins in signal transduction and downstream effects.

BS32009 - Immunology

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module will provide students with a broad understanding of key topics in immunology. This module will underpin more specialised areas of  immunology that the students will encounter in their Level 4 laboratory projects and in Semester 2 of Level 4. The module aims to strengthen students’ skills in problem solving, critical analysis of scientific literature and will be able to explain central concepts in the field of immunology and relate this to protection against infectious disease.

Students will be able to explain central concepts in the field of immunology and relate this to protection against infectious disease, innate immune mechanisms that sense and eliminate pathogens, processing and presentation of antigenic material to drive immune responses, antibody-mediated protection, development and activation of B and T lymphocytes, lymphocyte function, mucosal immune defences, immunological memory and vaccination, immunity to viruses, immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmune diseases and immune hyper reactivity.

BS32022 - Human Morphogenesis and embryonic development

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module will provide the anatomical background to the human systems studied in the Biomedical Stream at level 3.

After study of this module, students will be able to; recognise the gross anatomy and histology of the systems covered, describe the pathology of these systems and explain the development of systems during the first trimester

BS42006: Advanced Immunology

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

The aim of this Module is to provide students with an in-depth understanding of a variety of major topics in immunology and to strengthen students’ skills in problem solving, critical analysis of scientific literature, and in self-directed learning. Topics covered in this module include innate immune mechanisms, Toll-like receptors and signalling, inhibitory/activatory receptors, immunoglobulin biology, antibody engineering for therapy and research, lymphocyte activation and signalling, T cell mediated immunity, immune hyper reactivity and immunodeficiency, cross-talk between autophagy and immunity pathways, and cytokine receptor signalling.

BS42007: Cancer Biology

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

The aim of this Module is to provide students with a broad understanding of key topics in cancer biology. Topics covered will include an introduction to cancer pathology, an introduction to the molecular biology of cancer, cancer treatment – chemotherapy and radiotherapy: mechanisms of action, oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, growth factors, cell signalling pathways, cancer viruses, environmental carcinogenesis, and DNA damage and repair.

BS42009: Advanced Molecular Microbiology

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

The aim of this module is to provide a specialised insight into advanced cell and developmental biology, through the prism of stem cell biology. This module will extend and build on the students’ knowledge gained in Level 1 -3 and will provide plenty of opportunities for the students to engage in, as well as critically appraise and evaluate, cutting edge research in highly topical cell and developmental biology subjects in normal and disease physiologies. The module will explore the basics of what stem cells are, and the molecular mechanisms required to maintain them or allow them to differentiate into different lineages, covering embryonic and adult stem cells in both endogenous and disease states. Topics will reflect the following areas: Introduction to stem cells, Embryonic stem cells, Epigenetic regulation in stem cells, Reprogramming/iPS cells, Asymmetric cell division, Tissue stem cells, Stem cells during development.

BS42012: Parasitology

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

The aim of this module is to introduce students to molecular, cellular and biochemical studies on selected parasitic protozoa. Students will gain an understanding of selected parasites, common approaches to their study and development of chemotherapies against them. Topics covered will reflect key areas such as genetic approaches, immune evasion, drug delivery, drug targets and drug mode-of-action.

BS42013: Advanced Cell Signalling

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

The aim of this module is to build on Level 3 studies of Cell Signalling, and take students close to the forefront in selected areas of cell signalling research. The module will cover protein kinase families; recognition of substrates by protein kinases; regulation of protein kinases; protein phosphatase families; targeting of phosphatases via regulatory subunits; sensing of energy by AMPK; organization of protein phosphorylation networks by 14:3:3 proteins; signalling in the innate immune system; and analysis of T cell signalling by phosphoproteomics.

BS42014: Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolic Dysfunction

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

This module will provide a physiological perspective on the ways in which macro and micronutrients (glucose, fatty acids, amino acids and iron) modulate both cellular responses and endocrine/neuropeptide function in mammalian cells with particular emphasis on how such modulation is essential for normal physiological homeostasis and how its dysregulation contributes to the development of conditions such as obesity and diabetes. Topics covered include nutrient transporters and their regulation, control of appetite via leptin and central mechanisms, sensing of dietary and extracellular nutrients, signalling of nutrient availability to effector processes (e.g. synthesis of protein and nutrient storage materials), interactions between nutrient-signalling (mTORC1) and endocrine (e.g. insulin/growth factor) signalling pathways, and pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes.

BS42015: Regulation of Oxygen and Fuel Utilisation

Semester 2

Number of credits: 15

The aim of this module is to ensure students have a detailed understanding of how the human body and its component cells regulate oxygen uptake and the role of this gas in converting nutrients into energy; a familiarity with the mechanisms by which systems and cells detect variation in oxygen availability and how they respond at metabolic, molecular and genetic levels to maintain aerobic homeostasis; an awareness of (i) how cells respond to energetic stress caused by restriction or excess of nutrient and oxygen availability and (ii) diseases and genetic disorders which affect the normal functioning of the above processes.

Topics covered in the module include:

  • Ventilation: Perfusion matching in the lung during exercise and in low oxygen environments
  • Meeting oxygen demands during exercise at high altitude
  • Molecular mechanisms of peripheral chemoreception at high altitude
  • Molecular mechanisms of genetic oxygen sensing and hypoxic adaptation
  • Uncoupling proteins and the regulation of basal metabolism
  • Mechanisms of fuel selection in muscle
  • The discovery of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway
  • Regulation of AMPK during muscle contraction
  • Metabolic responses to AMPK activation
  • Activation of glucose uptake & chronic adaptations of muscle to exercise
  • Effects of AMPK activation on gene expression and cell growth
  • Health benefits of exercise with respect to obesity and type 2 diabetes

BS42017: Psychiatric Disorders

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the psychopathology and treatment of a range of common psychiatric conditions including drug addiction. The module will specifically promote an appreciation of the role of experimental studies of behaviour and neuroimaging of the brain in understanding psychiatric disorders, knowledge of drug treatments available for psychiatric disorder and the rationale to their use, an understanding of the neurobiology and mood disorder schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and addictions, awareness of current research upon drugs of abuse with emphasis upon cannabinoids and the debate regarding the use of such drugs for medicinal purposes, and knowledge of opioid dependence, its mechanisms, epidemiology, consequences for the individual and society and the evolution of treatment strategies in the U.K.

BS42018: Synaptic Plasticity and Cognition

This module will address the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie various forms of synaptic plasticity. It will promote:

  • Familiarity with the experimental techniques including neuroanatomical, neurochemical, and neurophysiological that have been used to study synaptic plasticity and how this phenomenon relates to higher order functions including behaviour and cognition
  • An appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of molecular genetic and behavioural genetic approaches in linking cellular and circuit phenomena to cognition
  • An ability to frame at a theoretical level how changes in synaptic plasticity may underpin changes at higher levels of analysis.

BS42019: Cardiovascular Pharmacology

This module will present advanced aspects of cardiovascular pharmacology. It will specifically promote knowledge of the role of the endothelium in the control of vascular smooth muscle tone, detailed understanding of neurohumoral mediators of vascular smooth muscle tone, a comprehensive understanding of the cardiac action potential and the membrane conductances that underlie it, understanding of cardiac ischaemic and the phenomenon of ischaemic preconditioning as a protective mechanism, and a knowledge of common cardiac dysrhythmias and their treatment by drugs.

BS42021: Heart and Circulation

This module will provide an understanding of the physiological control mechanisms in the heart and peripheral circulation as an integrated system, as well as the cellular pathways (i.e. risk factor pathways) involved in the development of cardiovascular disease and how this can lead to a variety of acute and chronic clinical complications. This will also give students a knowledge base in state-of-the-art techniques for research in cardiovascular medicine.

Topics will include the physiology and pathophysiology of cardiac muscle and the cellular basis of new and evolving therapies, central and hormonal control of cardiac output in health and disease, physiology and pathophysiology of microvascular and macrovascular function and regulation, and advantages and disadvantages of current biomarker techniques for evaluation of endothelial function and arterial stiffness.

BS42023: Applied Neuroanatomy & Neurodegenerative Disorders

Students will be introduced to the clinical morphology and pathology of nervous system function, neural disease and neurodegenerative disorders. The module will specifically promote knowledge of imaging techniques used to investigate the central nervous system; an appreciation of the relationship between abnormal structure of nervous system disease, knowledge of the mechanisms that underlie Alzheimers, Creutzfeldt Jacob, Parkinson and Huntington disease; an appreciation that abnormal protein aggregates are a common feature in neurodegenerative disorders; and an awareness of current therapeutic strategies available for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and the potential for the development of novel treatment strategies.

BS42024: Sensory Systems

This module will explore the anatomy and physiology of selected mammalian sensory systems including the auditory, visual and olfactory systems. It will promote: familiarity with the experimental techniques used to probe the physiology of cells, circuits and systems and the principles of sensory physiology that have emerged from such studies; awareness of the commonalities and differences that exist between the functioning of the systems presented; knowledge of the visual pathway from the retina to the visual cortex, and the plasticity exhibited by neurons innervating the visual cortex; knowledge of odorant receptors, the processing of afferent signals by the olfactory bulb, and ideas concerning odor perception; and knowledge of the basis of select sensory dysfunctions and the approaches that have been utilized to correct them.

BS42025: Analgesic and Anaesthetic Pharmacology

This module aims to promote an understanding of the mode of action of analgesic and general anaesthetic drugs at a modern and advanced level, specifically (i) to relate the complex state of general anaesthesia to the modulation of the function of specific transmitter-gated ion channels within the CNS, (ii) to describe the actions of endogenous neurosteroids as anxiolytic and sedative molecules, (iii) to illustrate the complexity of modern anaesthesia and the management of the patient in the peri-operative period by multiple drugs and (iv) to describe emerging targets for new analgesic agents.

BS42027: Cancer Pharmacology and Treatment

The aim of this module is to provide students with advanced research-led teaching of key topics in cancer pharmacology and treatment. This module will build on previously encountered specialised areas of pharmacology, biochemistry, molecular cell biology and genetics. Topics will include cancer pathology and the molecular biology of cancer, cancer treatment - chemotherapy and radiotherapy: mechanisms of action, pharmacogenetics - inherited differences in drug response, mutational signatures in common cancers - identification and prioritisation of novel drug targets, cancer stem cells, drug resistance mechanisms, individuality in treatment response, and the role of tissue banks and the research ethics service.

Laboratory teaching

Throughout the programme there is an emphasis on laboratory teaching, and you will be encouraged to see how the blending of field and laboratory based research is essential to the training of a properly rounded biomedical scientist.

Top-rated research staff are involved in planning and teaching our degree programmes, and recent research developments are reflected in our teaching, particularly at the advanced levels.

MSci Integrated Masters Programme

Develop your own research project and work for five months in a lab with our MSci Programme.

Biomedical Science Personal Statement Examples and Tips

In order to successfully qualify for a biomedical science degree, you may need to produce a personal statement for masters in biomedical science. Statement of purpose biomedical science examples provide a valuable template and guidance to individuals writing their personal statements. With personal statement biomedical science, you are able to gain valuable insight, which you may not easily get by just reading a manual. We provide examples which you can follow and use as guide as you write a personal statement. In addition, we also provide customized personal statement for masters in biomedical science. Here is a short example for your perusal.

Biomedical Science Personal Statement Tips

Review all information regarding the program that you are applying to in biomedical science to ensure that you have a full understanding of the skills and other attributes that they are looking for from their students.

Match their requirements to your specific skills so that you can show that you are a good match to their requirements.

Ensure that you are prepared to fully cover the questions that they will want answered within their personal statement:

  • Why do you want to study biomedical science?
  • What have you already done to pursue your interests?
  • How are you qualified to complete this program?
  • What are your career goals once you have finished this program?
  • Do you have specific reasons for applying to this biomedical program?

Keep within the word count that they are asking for; typically you will be asked for a single page of writing although you do need to check the specific requirements of the program that you are applying to.

Be very concise in your writing; do not use more words than you need to when making your points. Also avoid stating the obvious or repeating any information that you have already provided within your application. Make every word of your statement count.

Be completely relevant; this is a personal statement about you and your desire to study biomedical science. So if what you want to write is not about you or does not forward that aim then it does not belong in your statement.

The language that you use must be appropriate; never use slang or acronyms as they may not be understood by the reader. Also do not try to be clever by using unusual words that you have sourced from your thesaurus but would never use in every day speech.

Never use clichés; opening with “Ever since I was a young child..” is guaranteed to lose the reader right from the start.

Be honest; never lie or even exaggerate anything as it will be discovered at some point.

Avoid any writing errors; proofread your work very carefully or even better; have another proofread your work for you.

Find more biomedical science samples here:

Or ask our writers to craft a custom personal statement for you!

Biomedical Science Personal Statement

I have always been interested in human body and intrigued how the complex and diverse mechanisms of the human body work in concert to enable an individual function effectively and efficiently. From simple cells combining together to form tissues, organs and the entire human body, it is truly a marvel of nature that such a complex mechanism and being exists. And my goal is to understand it to the fullest of my capacity. I believe that being able to pursue a career in biomedical science will help me greatly in reaching this goal.

I have always been fascinated with biology and its various applications, especially in the human body. Pursuing a degree in biomedical science will help me fulfill these interests while at the same time, I will be able to enhance my potential and skills in both science and engineering. As a student, I’ve always given keen interest to my various science subjects. I have continued to exert effort in my science subjects as these subjects interest me greatly. Being interested in the human body and in science, I believe that this is a great advantage in pursuing a degree in biomedical science. I am equipped with the basic necessary skills to be able to strive and perform well in this field. Moreover, I have the burning passion to pursue this degree, being inspired by various scientists and having the perseverance and the thirst to learn more about these subjects that interest me.

I believe that pursuing a degree in biomedical science is the only way to go for me. I have never found another opportunity and field to be able to balance both my interests and my passion. I have the skill and the knowledge required and I know that I am capable of performing excellently in this field. I look forward to studying and pursuing a degree in biomedical science in your university. Being accepted means that I will be able to pursue my dream while at the same time serving out my passion.

Personal Statement Examples Biomedical Science

While biomedical science personal statement examples are a great help, we also provide custom biomedical personal statement examples to ensure that you will get a personalized and customized personal statement like no other. You will get the highest quality of work while at the same time ensuring that your personal touch is not lost in these personal statements.

Contact us and see what we have to offer. With us, you will be able to write the statement of purpose biomedical science for your admission!

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