Works Cited Mla Research Paper

Summary:

MLA (Modern Language Association) style is most commonly used to write papers and cite sources within the liberal arts and humanities. This resource, updated to reflect the MLA Handbook (8th ed.), offers examples for the general format of MLA research papers, in-text citations, endnotes/footnotes, and the Works Cited page.

Contributors: Tony Russell, Allen Brizee, Elizabeth Angeli, Russell Keck, Joshua M. Paiz, Michelle Campbell, Rodrigo Rodríguez-Fuentes, Daniel P. Kenzie, Susan Wegener, Maryam Ghafoor, Purdue OWL Staff
Last Edited: 2017-06-19 09:55:05

This page provides an example of a Works Cited page in MLA 2016 format.

Works Cited

Dean, Cornelia. "Executive on a Mission: Saving the Planet." The New York Times, 22 May 2007, www.nytimes.com/2007/05/22/science/earth/22ander.html?_r=0. Accessed 12 May 2016.

Ebert, Roger. Review of An Inconvenient Truth, directed by Davis Guggenheim. rogerebert.com, 1 June 2006, www.rogerebert.com/reviews/an-inconvenient-truth-2006. Accessed 15 June 2016.

Gowdy, John. "Avoiding Self-organized Extinction: Toward a Co-evolutionary Economics of Sustainability." International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, vol. 14, no. 1, 2007, pp. 27-36.

An Inconvenient Truth. Directed by Davis Guggenheim, performances by Al Gore and Billy West, Paramount, 2006.

Leroux, Marcel. Global Warming: Myth Or Reality?: The Erring Ways of Climatology. Springer, 2005.

Milken, Michael, et al. "On Global Warming and Financial Imbalances." New Perspectives Quarterly, vol. 23, no. 4, 2006, p. 63.

Nordhaus, William D. "After Kyoto: Alternative Mechanisms to Control Global Warming." American Economic Review, vol. 96, no. 2, 2006, pp. 31-34.

---. "Global Warming Economics." Science, vol. 294, no. 5545, 9 Nov. 2001, pp. 1283-84, DOI: 10.1126/science.1065007.

Regas, Diane. “Three Key Energy Policies That Can Help Us Turn the Corner on Climate.” Environmental Defense Fund, 1 June 2016, www.edf.org/blog/2016/06/01/3-key-energy-policies-can-help-us-turn-corner-climate. Accessed 19 July 2016.

Revkin, Andrew C. “Clinton on Climate Change.” The New York Times, 17 May 2007, www.nytimes.com/video/world/americas/1194817109438/clinton-on-climate-change.html. Accessed 29 July 2016.

Shulte, Bret. "Putting a Price on Pollution." US News & World Report, vol. 142, no. 17, 14 May 2007, p. 37. Ebsco, Access no: 24984616.

Uzawa, Hirofumi. Economic Theory and Global Warming. Cambridge UP, 2003.

 

Format of the MLA Works Cited Page in MLA 7

Quick facts:

  • The Works Cited list typically appears at the end of a paper.
  • Name the page “Works Cited.” While “Bibliography” and “Literature Cited” are sometimes used, Works Cited is often the most appropriate.
    • An Annotated Bibliography is different than a Works Cited list. An annotated bibliography includes brief summaries and evaluations of the sources. Check out our page on Annotated Bibliographies to learn more.
  • Make the Works Cited page the next consecutive page number. If the last page of your project is page 12, the Works Cited list will be page 13.

Format of the Paper:

  1. Use one-inch margins around the paper. Double-space the entire document.
  2. Place the title of the page (Works Cited) in the center of the page, an inch from the top.
  3. Create a double space between the title (Works Cited) and the first citation.
  4. Each citation should start on the left margin (one inch from the side of the paper).
  5. For longer citations, indent the second and any subsequent lines one half inch from the beginning of the citation. This is called a hanging citation.

Example of a hanging citation:

Kondō, Marie. The Life-changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese

             Art of Decluttering and Organizing. New York: Ten Speed,

             2014. Print.

 

Format of Citations:

  1. Place citations in alphabetical order by the author’s last name. If there are two works by the same author, alphabetize by the last name of the second author (if there is one). If there is only the single author, alphabetize by the title of the work.

Two or More Works by the Same Author

If there are two works by the same author, it is not necessary to type out their full name for each citation. Instead, type out the full name in the first citation only. For all subsequent citations, in place of the name, type three hyphens with a period at the end.

 

Example:

 

Sparks, Nicholas. The Notebook. New York: Warner, 1996. Print.

 

—. A Walk to Remember. New York, NY: Warner, 1999.
Print.

 

If the author is listed along with another author, type out the full name of each author, do not use the hyphens and periods.

 

Example:

 

Sparks, Nicholas. The Notebook. New York: Warner, 1996. Print.

 

—. A Walk to Remember. New York, NY: Warner, 1999.
              Print.

 

Sparks, Nicholas, and Micah Sparks. Three Weeks with My Brother.


              New York: Warner, 2004. Print.

 

Two or More Works by the Same Authors:

 

When there are two or more works by multiple authors, use hyphens and periods.

 

Example:

 

Rosenthal, Amy Krouse, and Tom Lichtenheld. Duck! Rabbit! San

             Francisco: Chronicle, 2009. Print.

—. Exclamation Mark.

             New York: Scholastic, 2013. Print.

 

Don’t forget, you can create your MLA citations quickly and easily on EasyBib.

For more information on creating your MLA Works Cited page, check out Writing Commons and Illinois Valley Community College’s website.

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